by Kacey Bradley December 03, 2020 3 min read

As the world presses on through the COVID-19 pandemic, people will continue to celebrate personal milestones. You received a wedding invitation in the mail or helped a family member plan their ceremony, so you went. Now you’re wondering how you should keep an eye on your health in case the virus invaded even a small, socially distanced ceremony.

These are a few simple actions to take after a wedding during COVID-19. If you abide by certain precautions and keep track of your symptoms, you can take the necessary steps to take care of yourself and your loved ones.

Start Your Quarantine

Even if you’re not sure that you came in contact with an infected person, it’s wise to start your quarantine as soon as you get home from the wedding. Although symptoms may not appear for the first two days, you could still infect the people around you. Even if they don’t appear, you could spread the virus if you’re asymptomatic.

Schedule a Test

It’s crucial to schedule a test after you begin quarantining. You can find one with healthcare providers or locate a community-based testing site that doesn’t require insurance to get a free test. Your results will prove if you can get back to work or seek medical assistance.

You should note that even if your test comes back negative, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) still recommends that you quarantine if someone at the wedding tested positive. You would have been within close contact with them and could still develop symptoms within the bounds of your quarantine.

Review Your Hygiene Routine

It’s also smart to review your hygiene routine. Even after your quarantine ends, you should do everything in your power to not catch or spread the virus. Wear your mask whenever you leave home and always maintain six feet of distance between yourself and people who live outside your house.

You can also minimize your germ contact within your home. Consider what you come into contact with most frequently — even something as routine as your aligners. Touching them during insertion and removal introduces new bacteria into your body.

Clean with mindfulness by adjusting your sanitation supplies. Something that uses hydrogen peroxide will kill 99.999% of bacteria even on surfaces like aligners. You won’t need to worry about coming into contact with viruses in your home, even if you frequently wash your hands.

Contact Other Guests

You might know everyone who attended the wedding, especially if it was small. Contact the other guests so you know who exhibits symptoms or tests positive. Getting this information will make you more confident in your likelihood of getting sick or staying healthy in addition to being kind and transparent by exuding trust and confidence toward your guests.

Log Your Symptoms

Start logging your symptoms after the wedding ends. If you track your daily experiences and the severity of what you feel, you’ll get better medical care if you go to your doctor for help. Pinpointing when your fever rises and falls or when it’s most challenging to take a deep breath shows medical providers how severe your case is and what treatments will help you the most.

Every bit of information helps. Log your hourly temperature checks and even symptoms that you’re not sure are symptoms. They could be the key to accessing the correct medications or in-hospital treatments.

Call Your Doctor

These are just a few actions to take after a wedding during COVID-19. You can always check CDC guidelines and call your doctor for any additional steps if you feel they’re necessary. Do what you can to protect yourself and you’ll protect the people around you as well.



Also in Ideas & Inspiration

Tiny Details for Your Big Day: Preparing Restrooms for the Venue
Tiny Details for Your Big Day: Preparing Restrooms for the Venue

by Oscar Collins October 19, 2021 2 min read

Helping Your Children Find Their Own Path
Helping Your Children Find Their Own Path

by Peter Minkoff October 14, 2021 3 min read

Decorating Your Home on a Budget
Decorating Your Home on a Budget

by Dorothy Carter October 14, 2021 4 min read