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DIY Dried and Preserved Flower Arranging

DIY Dried and Preserved Flower Arranging

DIY Dried and Preserved Flower Arranging


Photo from The Shakers Brief Eternity,” September 1989, National Geographic magazine A Basic Dried Flower Arrangement

Place your vase on a lazy susan, this is something you will glad you have for floral designing.  Find them at art supply stores (sculpting section) or look for one in a resale shop. from Kristen at Kio Kreations Use floral clay to affix your vase or basket onto to the lazy susan -  make sure you can turn it easily to view your arrangement from all sides.

1. Wedge a piece of floral foam into your container. Establish the overall shape of the design using line material such as dried or preserved grasses,dried or preserved lavender, dried wheat, straw, etc.. (See all the dried botanicals and fillers) Fill in the center with maidenhair fern, caspia, gyp,flax, galax leaves or any dried foliage.(See all the preserved flowers and greenery)

2. Insert the larger focal flowers like hydrangeas or cockscomb first , then add medium size flowers like dried and preserved roses, straw flowers. Space the flowers evenly throughout.

3. Add some additional line material like larkspur or delphinium to accent the overall shape, and add extra fern to fill in any empty spaces.  Use dried flax for fullness. 

Dried Floral Tree

Small trees made with real branches for the trunk and a cone-shaped piece of dry foam for the tree are easy and charming. Purchase some plaster of Paris (not pre-mixed), a container, some moss and floral pins to secure the moss and small, dried flora for tree decorations.

1. Line your container with slivers of floral foam. The plaster of Paris expands as it sets. The foam acts as a cushion and keeps the pot from cracking.

2. Mix enough plaster of Paris and water to fill the pot two thirds full. Make sure the slivers of foam stay in place as you spoon the mixture into the pot.

3. Insert the trunk, making sure it rests on the bottom of the pot. Turn the pot and adjust the trunk until it looks straight from all angles. Add plaster to within 1" of the top of the pot.

4. When the plaster is dry, push the foam cone onto the trunk, and cover it with moss. Use floral pins to hold the moss in place.

5. Decorate the tree by hot gluing dried flowers and leaves to the moss. Cover the top of the plaster with glue and add moss and a few flowers.

Note: Really small trees do not require anchoring in plaster. Wedge a piece of floral foam snugly into the pot, and insert the trunk with the foam in place.

 


Photo from Ceremony Magazine

Blossoming Tree

Large-scale arrangements need not be difficult to make or expensive. Gather several natural tree branches (or any suitable branches), 8 to 10 stems of dried delphinium, preserved orchids, preserved rose heads and some floral foam, a pot and some moss, and you have all the ingredients for a spectacular tree. The container you select will determine the mood of the arrangement. Wooden tubs, terra-cotta pots, fiberglass containers, Chinese ceramic pots, wicker or vine baskets are all interesting possibilities.

1. Secure the foam in the pot with hot glue.

2. Insert the branches in the foam. When you have them where you want them, add quick setting plaster to the pot covering the space around the foam and around the branches. When the plaster dries, cover it with some moss.

3. Use hot glue to attach tiny florets of dried hydrangea, orchids or rose heads to the branches. Distribute them evenly throughout the tree and build up density gradually. Glue the flowers where branches meet rather than along an open branch

Continue in Floral Design Instruction with More dried flower arranging projects including a wreath and swag See more on drying flowers, arrangements and techniques below. 



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